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Date: Monday, January 27, 2020
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences undergraduate students. Graduate students might wish to consider the research-related skills offerings in the Graduate Professional Skills Program.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Writing to Cite

Learn how to develop effective strategies for academic research and how to correctly incorporate primary and secondary sources into your essays. Through short lectures, interactive class discussions and hands-on exercises, you will learn:

    The role of citation practices in the scholarly conversation The various styles of documentation The mechanics of “writing up” your sources The different types of publications and how to integrate and document your use of them To incorporate close reading to develop your own research interests and arguments What ideas you can claim as your own and which ones you cannot How to avoid inadvertent plagiarism

Key terms for this session: close reading, signaling, quoting, paraphrasing

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

    Critical Reading Annotated Bibliographies Literature Reviews
Date: Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: Robarts Library

Learn how to safely operate the LulzBot TAZ 6 3D printers. You must complete this safety training session before you can use our 3D printers. You must also pass our 3D printing knowledge test.

If you would like this presentation to be offered at a different day or time, please provide feedback to us at digital.studio@utoronto.ca.

Date: Wednesday, January 29, 2020
Time: 10:00am - 12:00pm
Location: UTSC Library
Campus: UTSC

This session occurs at the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus and is part of the Digital Scholarship @UTSC Series.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to search strategies and techniques for accessing and exploring variables, including both averages and distributions, on population, family structure, household size and type, ethnic diversity, languages spoken, labour force participation, and income.

Attendees will work through hands-on exercises to identify patterns, normalize data, create charts, graphs and other simple visualizations using Microsoft Excel.

Note: This workshop will not cover statistical concepts or tests. Only very basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.

Audience

Open

Additional instructions

If you are affiliated with the St. George or UTM campus please complete the lab visitor access request webform prior to the session so that you will be able to use the computers in the lab. Alternatively, you may wish to bring your own computer.

Directions

University of Toronto Scarborough Library, Instruction Lab, Room AC286A

Visiting UTSC for the first time? The Library is located in the AC building. A campus map and information on public transportation and visitor parking can be found at https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/home/visiting-utsc.

Date: Friday, January 31, 2020
Time: 1:00pm - 3:30pm
Location: Robarts Library

Part 3: Going Grey and Supplementary Search Techniques

Audience: University of Toronto graduate students and faculty engaged in health science research

Date: Friday, January 31, 2020

Time: 1:00pm - 3:30pm

Location: Robarts Library Electronic Classroom  (4th floor)

Note: this course may be taken as part of the Graduate Professional Skills Program.

Knowledge syntheses that rely solely on published academic literature are at high risk of publication bias. Searching the grey literature is essential for mitigating this risk, but ‘grey literature’ is a nebulous concept, tricky to incorporate into syntheses and difficult to find.

Building on the skills we practiced in Parts 1 and 2, in this hands-on workshop students will learn to:

    Define what is grey literature (and what’s it’s not) Develop a strategy for identifying appropriate sources of grey literature  Utilize a methodological, transparent approach to searching sources of grey literature Demonstrate best practices for supplementary search techniques including hand-searching and reference tracking Integrate strategies for incorporating grey literature and supplementary search techniques into the review workflow Evaluate search methods to identify proper reporting

Instructors

Erica Lenton, MA, MLIS, is the rehabilitation and kinesiology librarian with the Gerstein Science Information Centre. Prior to arriving at Gerstein, Erica worked in continuing medical education and more recently, as a solo hospital librarian at the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton, Alberta. Through her experience in hospital and academic health science libraries, she has been involved in a number of systematic and scoping reviews and has provided expert searching and systematic review training for clinicians, students, and faculty.

Glyneva Bradley-Ridout, MI, is the pharmacy librarian with the Gerstein Science Information Centre. She also liaises with the department of nutritional sciences, and the department of pharmacology & toxicology in the Faculty of Medicine. Glyneva supports researchers conducting knowledge synthesis projects by providing training, curriculum embedded instruction, and expert searching. Prior to joining Gerstein, Glyneva was a hospital librarian at St. Michael’s Hospital where she was also involved in a number of systematic and scoping review projects.

Research and teaching

  • Research and course guides

    Research advice, useful tools, and the best resources for your needs curated by librarians.

  • Researcher support

    Services to help you with all facets of your research: finding materials; discovering resources; and managing your publications and research data.

  • Copyright and syllabus services

    Support for course readings, syllabi, publishing, and open access.

Help the University of Toronto Libraries in our mission to strengthen our outstanding collections, transform our accessible study spaces, and offer innovative research services.